HVAC

Boosting Sales in the Slow Season for HVAC Companies

Boosting Sales in the Slow Season for HVAC Companies

Autumn is upon us, which can only mean one thing: the slow season for HVAC companies has arrived. Traditionally, the hotter summer months and the colder winter months bring about a much greater need for HVAC service due to the extreme temperatures associated with both seasons. However, during the spring and fall, business owners often wonder what service an HVAC company can sell during the slow season.

Just because there’s seasonal downtime doesn’t mean that bills stop coming in, and that employees stop wanting a weekly paycheck. Boosting sales and driving growth during the HVAC slow season is important. But how can you do it? We’ve come up with four solutions that can help your field service company thrive during the slow season for HVAC.

Focus on preventative maintenance
It’s a general rule of thumb in the HVAC and field service business world that around 90 percent of customers only call when they have urgent problems that require immediate fixes. Although it makes sense to only call when there’s an emergency, it’s not good for your small- or medium-sized business’s year-round bill-paying and business-growing activities.

What can you do to fix this problem that occurs during the HVAC slow season? You can upsell preventative maintenance during the fall and spring months, which can help your company’s bottom line.

Pushing preventative maintenance during the slow season for HVAC businesses is also good for building relationships with your customers. Since you’re visiting these customers on-site when there’s not an emergency call or specific problem to fix, you’re gaining their confidence, being helpful, providing them value, and learning more about what HVAC services are important to them. Along with this, you can use fall and spring for preventative services to clear the deck for more urgent winter and summer service calls.

Preventative maintenance during the slow season for HVAC ties into connected field service as well. Just in case you aren’t familiar, connected field service is powered by the Internet of Things, or IoT. Connected devices—which are expected to be greater than 80 billion strong by 2025—are capable of sending HVAC performance information to a service shop’s headquarters, which allows your HVAC business to consistently participate in preventative maintenance—even during the winter and summer busy seasons.

In short, you are able to monitor HVAC units, and know when a machine is ready to break down. This technology helps during the HVAC slow season because you can call your client and say, “We need to come out to your site soon for a repair.” It builds a relationship with your customer, and keeps this person’s HVAC unit running smoothly. It’s a win-win. However, connected field service is still far off for some small businesses due to the costs involved with acquiring new technology and investing in infrastructure, but, given how quickly technology is advancing, it will arrive at scale sooner than you think.

Focus on Marketing
The winter and summer seasons are often madhouses when it comes to HVAC client needs, so focus on your marketing efforts during the fall and spring. While in the midst of the HVAC slow season you can:

Attend trade shows.
Send direct mailers and mass emails.
Have your technicians perform the preventative maintenance measures described above.
Bring a brochure or a one-page flyer about other services you offer when on these preventative service calls.
Consider Google PPC campaigns, or local Facebook ads to attract more attention during the HVAC slow season.
Search LinkedIn and Google News for ideas about new companies opening in or relocating to your business’s area of service. These companies may need large-scale SLAs to make sure that their buildings are heated and air-conditioned properly.

Consider sending rebate coupons to existing customers. For example, if a current customer refers a new customer, you give the referring client money back, or take a certain dollar amount off of his or her service contract.
There are numerous creative approaches to marketing and selling for HVAC companies, and the slow season for HVAC companies—particularly the fall—is a perfect time to research and explore these options.

Offer System Upgrades
Manufacturers tend to slash prices during the slow season for HVAC companies in order to close out inventory before the winter year-end mark. Although your company might make slightly less money on an HVAC system upgrade during the fall in comparison to the early summer, it can be a steady revenue stream during the HVAC down season.

Offer Home Performance Services
The rising costs of oil, natural gas, and electricity used to heat homes and business offices alike makes your customers eager when it comes to making sure that their HVAC systems are performing at optimal levels in order to keep utility costs down. Along with this, the cultural shift focused around the emergence of “smart homes” is driving customers to check their HVAC systems’ efficiency levels more often.

One way to drive your business’s bottom line is by offering these services in the fall during the heart of the HVAC slow season. Performance services are a bit like preventative maintenance services because you visit a client who doesn’t have an urgent need, and check on the HVAC system’s overall performance. However, your company can make a slightly larger profit from these jobs by adding in an “overall performance fee” to the preventative maintenance process. The slow season for HVAC companies is the perfect time to put that HVAC CRM to use, and figure out what existing clients could benefit from based on past orders and services.

Here’s a bonus idea:

This bonus idea is for you to try during the slow season for HVAC. It’s less about directly driving revenue, but it will help you grow your company’s bottom line in the future. If you have downtime in the fall or spring, you can use it to restructure some of the inefficient areas of your field service shop.

No, no, we don’t mean firing people on a whim in order to save your company money by reducing employee wages. What we mean is to think about your business’s operating processes, the products you sell, service contracts terms, and getting everything organized within the shop and office so that you can hit the ground running when the busy winter and summer HVAC seasons strike. A good place to start organizing your HVAC business during the slow season is our Field Service Management software. You can download our guide right here, and contact us if you are ready to get your field service business ready for the busy season!

We put together an eBook on various aspects of service level agreements — a good example of something you can reorganize during the fall. To learn more, download it now.


Field Service Growth

Does Your Field Service Business Have Growth or Is it Just the Weather?

Does Your Field Service Business Have Growth or Is it Just the Weather?

Because some field service industries — especially HVAC — tend to be seasonal in nature (or at least have more business in summer and winter), there’s sometimes a financial confusion that takes place. Managers assume growth (perhaps from an increased effort in marketing a field service business) when, in fact, it wasn’t growth — it was a seasonal abnormality that led to higher-than-expected revenues.

Managers at all types of seasonal businesses have been trying to solve this problem for years. Can it be solved? Yes. (Within reason.) Here’s the approach — with some photos to boot!

Step 1: Using data

This always seems to be Step 1 in any 2017 business process, right? Here’s what you need to do here. If you don’t have this data specifically on hand, well, that’s even more reason to have a integrated field service management (FSM) software program. What you’ll need is:

Annual sales data for the past 3-5+ years (5+ years is preferable)
Monthly sales data for the same period you choose to do annually

How you get this will be based on how you track sales and customer information. If you use FSM software, it’s all right at your fingertips and can be pulled up in under two minutes. From there, just copy and paste it into excel. Get your data to look something like this:

It’s not important to break month and year apart. That’s up to you. We like to break it out to filter by year and create different graphs when necessary. It’s always handy to have each individual piece of data in a column of its own.

Right now, if you were to graph the sales data it would look like this:

You can see sales go up and down based on the month. Obviously, this makes it hard to know if you’re actually doing well one month or if it’s just a month you always have high sales in.

Step 2: Calculate the centered moving average

If you’re working within Excel or another spreadsheet program, you’ll want to go six months into your sales data and type this:

=average(average(select first year of monthly sales),average(select first year of monthly sales starting with second month))

Drag that formula all the way down to six months before the end of the data.

Here’s what it should look like:

What’s happening here? What is a centered moving average? See, many data series — especially field service sales — have an upward trend. You need to find a centered moving average to understand where your data really falls; otherwise November/December totals will almost always be higher than January/February totals just because of routine growth. Why does it stop 6 months from the present date? Because it’s the middle average. Or, the number it is producing is always in the middle of the data.

Step 3: Division

Here you’re going to find the ratio of your monthly sales compared to the average sales of the moving average of the year. Take monthly sales and divide that by the centered moving average calculated above. See here:

Step 4: More Division

Now that we have the ratio of what each month was in comparison to the year, we need to average each individual month to the same month of the other years. Average together each Ratio for “July” with the other Ratios of “July”. Drag the formula through one year, but make sure it isn’t trying to average data you don’t have at the bottom of the spreadsheet. In our example, we had to remove the last value for “June” because we didn’t have that data. Once these numbers are calculated though, you no longer need the formula. Copy just the numbers all the way down your spreadsheet (all the way to the current month). These numbers will keep on repeating because they represent an average of the amount of your sales in a year that come from a specific month.

See here:

Step 5: A Little More Division

The last step is simple. Take your monthly sales and divide that by the Average Monthly Ratio.

That results in data without seasonality. Since we calculated the average percentage of annual sales based on month, we can use these numbers to figure out our seasonality all the way to present date. Keep in mind, the more data you have the more accurate this will be.

See here:

Graphing

Lay all this data out in graphs and see what other trends arise. See the graph below compared to before:

What does this graph mean? The sales line represents what sales actually were for that month, while the deseasonalized line shows what your sales were without the “seasonal” trends. What the data really shows us are the longer term trends. In our example, the company appears to have had a rough couple years, but then has been growing pretty steadily since then. Without the Deseasonalized data, you may look at the data from March 2015 to December 2015 and think the company was going downhill again, but if you look at it with the seasonal trends considered, the company stays relatively consistent in sales throughout that period. Of course, if we had even more data we may be able to reveal a cyclic trend.

Caveat

We made the above relatively simple, but if you haven’t worked with centered moving average or Excel before, the first time may be a little bit challenging. No worries. You will get it.

The overall idea here is to figure out whether your company is growing, or whether seasonal effects are the reason for revenue shifts. Just because sales in December are up from November doesn’t necessarily mean you’re having a good month. In fact, you may be down in comparison to your average sales for December. In short? You want good, clean data as opposed to “data that proves your point.” This isn’t just for fun (probably wasn’t fun at all, to be honest), but it can give you a real look at whether your company is growing, or whether your company is shrinking. Managing cash flow for field service can be difficult if you don’t consider the seasonality ups and downs of your business.

If you’re looking at your numbers and seeing the kind of seasonality that our example portrayed, you’re probably thinking about how despite your sales going up and down, your employee costs stay the same. What do you do with your techs when they have seasonal downtime? We wrote an eBook that covers that topic, and other topics regarding productivity, here. Of course, within the eBook we discuss our field service software solutions. Check it out, and let us know if you have any questions below in the comments (or send us an e-mail here).

30 Days eBook


FSM Software Savings

Worksheet For Calculating Field Service Software Savings

Worksheet For Calculating Field Service Software Savings

We talk about dozens of different field service topics on this blog, ranging from wearable devices to marketing approaches to having more cash flow on hand. All are noble (if we do say so ourselves) and all have a place in running a field service shop in 2016 — er, almost 2017.

But ultimately, a lot of this comes back to money and cost. We sell field service management (FSM) software, and it helps us if you buy into that software. But we also work with a lot of small businesses and, for them, cost is a potentially restrictive factor. We’ve gotten dozens — hundreds? — of our own leads over the years where people talk to us forever about buying FSM software, and then ultimately does not. In most of these cases, the problem is cost. These leads are afraid the cost to buy the software will outstrip the savings from the software. They want to know the actual savings from field service software.

So, we decided to take action. (** Cue Rocky theme song. **)

We put together a savings eBook. You need to know some core numbers about your business to complete this, but that shouldn’t be very hard. Here, you get:

A worksheet for calculating the savings associated with using FSM software
A step-by-step guide to filling out that worksheet
Ideas about comparing pre- and post-FSM software implementation to best calculate ROI (not just for field service software, but any future investments)

If you walk through the steps and instructions and plug in the numbers, you can begin to see your potential savings — and you can see how some of your core metrics (completed vs. invoiced jobs, for example, or first-time fix rate) will improve by implementing FSM software.

The best part? Armed with this knowledge, you have the ability to see if you’re actually saving money by using field service software. That’s power, my friends.

We won’t bore you with any more lead-in now. If you think a cost/savings calculator would be valuable for your 2017 decision-making processes, grab it now. As always, reach out with any questions.

Worksheet Savings


FSM Marketing

The Best Marketing a Service Business Can Do

The Best Marketing a Service Business Can Do

We talk a lot about marketing within business. How do you market yourself? How do you position yourself? What will differentiate you? Marketing a service business can be a challenge.

There are many answers to these questions, and the scope is more complex than a simple blog post on a website. But if you’re on this particular website, you likely run — or work at — a service business. Perhaps you’ve even read our guide to kickstarting marketing in field service. But in a service business, one of the major differentiators is, well, the service. More specifically, it’s a combination of the service and the people providing the service. In your case, it would be the technicians of whatever business you run (HVAC, electrical, computer service, plumbing, etc.)

You probably know all of the above already. None of that should be new, per se. But now the question is: How do you drive service quality up (the best form of marketing) and make more money in the process? That’s the ultimate 1-2 punch of goals in a field service business.

Despite what your technicians may tell you (sorry team), marketing is very much their job. In fact,it’s everyone’s job. But the only way technicians can be effective at the marketing side of the business is if their time is managed properly. Technicians are the connection between what you want your company to represent and what the client recognizes your company to represent.

Consider these two scenarios:

A technician arrives late for an appointment and lacks the right information about the customer and/or tools to do the job.
A technician arrives five minutes early with all the information and everything necessary loaded in the truck.

In bullet point No. 1, the technician is frazzled — and now has to run back to HQ or a warehouse in order to do the job successfully. There will be no sales, marketing, up-selling, or even retention or referral in this situation.

In bullet point No. 2, the technician is ready to work before the appointment even begins — and all of those other elements around marketing and sales have the potential to take place.

These are two polar-extreme examples of field service work, yes, but at many points in between these two points, technicians are either maximized time-wise or always feeling like they must catch up. This isn’t good for your clients, or for your employees’ work-life balance. If you’re worried about retention (like every service company ever), then you might want to start thinking about those little buzzwords.

So, here’s where we stand.

The best marketing is high-quality service being provided by your techs.
For that to happen, your techs’ time needs to be managed properly.
When that happens, you will make more money.

How do you get to this place?

One of the best ways is field service software, (fsm software, for short) which integrates the different aspects of your business together. (Think inventory, customer information, data, scheduling, invoicing, and more.) With an integrated fsm software, schedules become more optimized. First-time fix rate goes up. Your marketing plan — better service — works like a charm.

But, of course, this FSM software is going to cost you something. It’s not free.

How will you know it’s profitable in the end? Where is the ROI?

For that, simply download this eBook now. We walk through 10 profit-growing benefits of FSM software. (One of the 10 is tied to marketing, yes.)

FSM Profitable


Management Software

Get The Most Out of Your Field Service Management Software

Get The Most Out of Your Field Service Management Software

At a trade show recently, we met a small business field service owner. We ended up having a great conversation, and one aspect stood out. He told us that he searches the Internet all the time for solutions for small businesses, but most of the articles he finds are fluffy and generic. They’re full of buzzwords. “Don’t get me started on some of the groups and forums out there,” he said. “They used to be good, but now it’s all just people selling stuff to you.”

We know how that feels. So, we asked this owner what types of resources he would want.

He gave us a few ideas, but again, one stood out. “A lot of times,” he admitted, “my decision-making gets held up because I know I need something, like field service management software or a new truck or whatever it is, but I get stopped because I know the cost equation but not the rollout.”

This was interesting. Many people make decisions based off cost — especially SMBs. We try to price our solutions appropriately as a result. But we hadn’t been thinking as much about why decisions really get stopped: lack of knowledge about execution.

With this owner in mind, here’s what we did: we put together a document about all the steps in the process of using and maximizing field service software. It starts with “even thinking about the idea.” and it goes all the way through using it with actual customers and contracts.

You can get it below. We hope it’s helpful.

FSM Software


Plumbing Techs

3 Quick Tips to Keep Your Plumbing Techs Productive

Boosting Sales in the Slow Season for HVAC Companies

Autumn is upon us, which can only mean one thing: the slow season for HVAC companies has arrived. Traditionally, the hotter summer months and the colder winter months bring about a much greater need for HVAC service due to the extreme temperatures associated with both seasons. However, during the spring and fall, business owners often wonder what service an HVAC company can sell during the slow season.

Just because there’s seasonal downtime doesn’t mean that bills stop coming in, and that employees stop wanting a weekly paycheck. Boosting sales and driving growth during the HVAC slow season is important. But how can you do it? We’ve come up with four solutions that can help your field service company thrive during the slow season for HVAC.

Focus on preventative maintenance
It’s a general rule of thumb in the HVAC and field service business world that around 90 percent of customers only call when they have urgent problems that require immediate fixes. Although it makes sense to only call when there’s an emergency, it’s not good for your small- or medium-sized business’s year-round bill-paying and business-growing activities.

What can you do to fix this problem that occurs during the HVAC slow season? You can upsell preventative maintenance during the fall and spring months, which can help your company’s bottom line.

Pushing preventative maintenance during the slow season for HVAC businesses is also good for building relationships with your customers. Since you’re visiting these customers on-site when there’s not an emergency call or specific problem to fix, you’re gaining their confidence, being helpful, providing them value, and learning more about what HVAC services are important to them. Along with this, you can use fall and spring for preventative services to clear the deck for more urgent winter and summer service calls.

Preventative maintenance during the slow season for HVAC ties into connected field service as well. Just in case you aren’t familiar, connected field service is powered by the Internet of Things, or IoT. Connected devices—which are expected to be greater than 80 billion strong by 2025—are capable of sending HVAC performance information to a service shop’s headquarters, which allows your HVAC business to consistently participate in preventative maintenance—even during the winter and summer busy seasons.

In short, you are able to monitor HVAC units, and know when a machine is ready to break down. This technology helps during the HVAC slow season because you can call your client and say, “We need to come out to your site soon for a repair.” It builds a relationship with your customer, and keeps this person’s HVAC unit running smoothly. It’s a win-win. However, connected field service is still far off for some small businesses due to the costs involved with acquiring new technology and investing in infrastructure, but, given how quickly technology is advancing, it will arrive at scale sooner than you think.

Focus on Marketing
The winter and summer seasons are often madhouses when it comes to HVAC client needs, so focus on your marketing efforts during the fall and spring. While in the midst of the HVAC slow season you can:

Attend trade shows.
Send direct mailers and mass emails.
Have your technicians perform the preventative maintenance measures described above.
Bring a brochure or a one-page flyer about other services you offer when on these preventative service calls.
Consider Google PPC campaigns, or local Facebook ads to attract more attention during the HVAC slow season.
Search LinkedIn and Google News for ideas about new companies opening in or relocating to your business’s area of service. These companies may need large-scale SLAs to make sure that their buildings are heated and air-conditioned properly.

Consider sending rebate coupons to existing customers. For example, if a current customer refers a new customer, you give the referring client money back, or take a certain dollar amount off of his or her service contract.
There are numerous creative approaches to marketing and selling for HVAC companies, and the slow season for HVAC companies—particularly the fall—is a perfect time to research and explore these options.

Offer System Upgrades
Manufacturers tend to slash prices during the slow season for HVAC companies in order to close out inventory before the winter year-end mark. Although your company might make slightly less money on an HVAC system upgrade during the fall in comparison to the early summer, it can be a steady revenue stream during the HVAC down season.

Offer Home Performance Services
The rising costs of oil, natural gas, and electricity used to heat homes and business offices alike makes your customers eager when it comes to making sure that their HVAC systems are performing at optimal levels in order to keep utility costs down. Along with this, the cultural shift focused around the emergence of “smart homes” is driving customers to check their HVAC systems’ efficiency levels more often.

One way to drive your business’s bottom line is by offering these services in the fall during the heart of the HVAC slow season. Performance services are a bit like preventative maintenance services because you visit a client who doesn’t have an urgent need, and check on the HVAC system’s overall performance. However, your company can make a slightly larger profit from these jobs by adding in an “overall performance fee” to the preventative maintenance process. The slow season for HVAC companies is the perfect time to put that HVAC CRM to use, and figure out what existing clients could benefit from based on past orders and services.

Here’s a bonus idea:

This bonus idea is for you to try during the slow season for HVAC. It’s less about directly driving revenue, but it will help you grow your company’s bottom line in the future. If you have downtime in the fall or spring, you can use it to restructure some of the inefficient areas of your field service shop.

No, no, we don’t mean firing people on a whim in order to save your company money by reducing employee wages. What we mean is to think about your business’s operating processes, the products you sell, service contracts terms, and getting everything organized within the shop and office so that you can hit the ground running when the busy winter and summer HVAC seasons strike. A good place to start organizing your HVAC business during the slow season is our Field Service Management software. You can download our guide right here, and contact us if you are ready to get your field service business ready for the busy season!

We put together an eBook on various aspects of service level agreements — a good example of something you can reorganize during the fall. To learn more, download it now.

30 Days eBook


Keep Your Books Accurate With Quickbooks FSM Integration

Keep Your Books Accurate With Quickbooks FSM Integration

In terms of your financials and accounting, what’s most important to your field service organization? Some might say (maybe with a hint of humor) “Making sure we make a lot of money.” That’s a good goal! (Although in all honesty, your real goal should be good customer service — and the money will flow from that.)

The real answer to this question is “accuracy.” If your financials and accounting aren’t accurate, you open your business to a whole host of problems, from angry customers to penalties from the IRS. It’s important to be precise and focus on details in all aspects of business, but in financials and accounting, it’s crucial.

If you run a small business FSO, there’s a good chance you use Quickbooks for accounting: the software has a roughly 80% market share among SMBs.

Quickbooks is a great system, but like any technology, it’s prone to error based on the humans who input and move around the data.

If you use Quickbooks and accuracy of data is a concern, the next step in this process is: why is it a concern?

Typically, inaccurate data comes from one major issue: lack of communication among internal partners. Usually the financial and accounting data will be managed by someone in one of those departments, but if you’re a small shop, there’s a chance the same person who runs financials also does customer data — and heck, that person might even be your HR rep and your VP all at once. That’s the nature of a small business.

For financials to be accurate, though, all the customer information, employee hours, technician hours, and technician overtime needs to be accurate.

The easiest way to do this, typically, is to have one system that houses everything — as opposed to a paper-and-pen system where necessary elements are in different filing cabinets, or even a system where different people in your office use different technologies to achieve their main tasks (someone on Google vs. someone on Microsoft, for example).

Usually the easiest way to keep everything in one place is to use a FSM software tool. These integrate the different aspects of your business. So now scheduling information, and technician overtime, can be one screen away from customer data and sales leads.

This helps makes your financials more accurate, which is the most crucial element of your financials.

The next benefit to accurate financials is that your company can have a more detailed look at its revenue stream — and whether or not it’s a revenue generator. FSM software usually helps along this process for small business field service shops. If you’d like to know a little bit more about how FSM software can act as a revenue generator, download our eBook now. If you have any specific questions about your business model or location, let us know.

6 Steps


Boost Revenue

Boost Revenue with Reporting on KPIs

Boost Revenue with Reporting on KPIs

HVAC is usually one of the faster-moving field service verticals (clients need their locations cooled or heated immediately), but also one of the verticals least likely to adopt traditional FSM planning tools. According to research, 74% of HVACs don’t use any FSM software (such as a potential CRM) — and the 26% that do use it tend to only use GPS-enablement technology.

The idea of measuring success is tied to the concept of KPIs, or key performance indicators. These are aspects of your business that you measure, and when they’re doing well, the business is doing well. When they’re not, you’re in trouble. Their performance is a key indicator of business success in the field service vertical.

As you build and grow a small business field service organization, you have a variety of different challenges. Most of these arise from a lack of resources compared to some of your bigger, enterprise-level peers and competitors. When resources are a challenge, one of the best ways to counter that is through solid planning. Unfortunately, many organizations aren’t great at planning. They tend to overfocus on task work at the expense of priorities, and overwhelm new ideas and revenue-generating concepts with process. This happens in many small businesses we’ve worked with, as well.

The cornerstone of effective planning is the alignment of strategy (the big picture) with execution (what needs to be done day to day to support the strategy). When strategy isn’t aligned with execution, what happens is that each department determines its own priorities and workflow. Then the departments become disjointed and, instead of everyone on the same page at your company, people are operating from four to five different pages.

Aligning strategy and execution is hard for many organizations, especially because people often confuse ‘strategy’ (which refers to longer-term vision) with ‘operations’ (which refers to how things get done day to day). In addition to that, companies often don’t know what success should look like — i.e. how to measure it — aside from “We are making money.”

This idea of measuring success is tied to the concept of KPIs, or key performance indicators. These are aspects of your business that you measure, and when they’re doing well, the business is doing well. When they’re not, you’re in trouble. Their performance is a key indicator of business success.

Depending on which vertical of field service you work in, your KPIs take different forms. Many organizations use first-time fix rate as a major KPI, because it tends to correlate directly with customer satisfaction. Many also use percentage of billable hours, because it tends to show the effectiveness of your techs and processes in getting techs successfully to customers. Again, though, KPIs can vary by organization.

There’s one important thing to remember about how to tie KPIs to ultimate revenue growth, though. Oftentimes corporate leaders will say something in a meeting like, “We want to build a data-driven culture,” and regular employees aren’t exactly sure what that means — so it sounds like a series of buzzwords.

In reality, you should want to build a data-driven culture. Many companies claim to do that, but instead the data is only accessible by a few top people and maybe some analysts. It’s hard to have a data-driven culture without transparency, and it’s hard for KPIs to mean anything without a data-driven culture. Here’s how you can get better at this:

Embrace transparency: Some of your information is proprietary or needs to be guarded, but not all of it is. Have your data in one system — ideally an FSM software tool — and let everyone look at it. You can use different permission levels in terms of how much access different people can have, but your entire company should be able to see various performance data.

Provide weekly insights: Every Friday morning designate one person — be it an analyst or someone in sales/marketing — to send an e-mail to the entire staff recapping the past week in terms of key data points, website traffic, and anything else worth noting. This is crucial to building a culture where people really understand and care about KPIs and data. That type of culture will help you drive revenue. On the other hand, a culture where data is clustered among only a handful people and KPIs are never mentioned will help you drive task work and high turnover.

Tie everything back to goals and KPIs: If you launch a new project or marketing campaign, explain it to everyone working on it in the context of company goals and KPIs. Don’t just say, “We’re doing this because X-person said so.” Any time a person at your SMB field service organization works on a project, he or she should clearly understand the goals of the project and how those goals will be measured. What will success look like? If he or she doesn’t understand that, this person’s work is essentially happening in a vacuum. If you have too many projects occurring in a vacuum, it’s very hard to drive revenue.

These are complex topics even for the best-organized companies, so we put together an eBook on revenue growth in your FSO. Because it was written to be read across multiple types of field service, it doesn’t address every possible pain point for your specific company — so if you read it and have further questions, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’ve worked with hundreds of SMB FSOs and would love to help yours. For now, begin by downloading this eBook.

HVAC eBook